The Patient Prime Minister

dr-manmohan-singhThe Prime Minister of India, Dr. Manmohan Singh underwent a multiple bypass surgery at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) a few days ago. Dr. Singh is a diabetic and has a history of heart ailments. He has had a bypass surgery almost 20 years ago and also had to undergo an angioplasty subsequently. Dr. Singh is 76. The surgery was performed by the eminent cardiac surgeon Dr. Ramakant Panda, who is considered to be the foremost expert in ‘redo’ bypass surgeries. Dr. Panda, who is presently the CEO of the Asian Heart Institute, Mumbai is also an alumni of the prestigious AIIMS.aiims

While the extremely challenging surgery went of well and the Prime Minister is recovering, I could not help but wonder at the Marketing opportunity celebrity patients present for the hospital and the doctors.

Dr. Ramakant Panda is a very well known surgeon but the kind of fame that operating on the Prime Minister will bring to him would do his already busy practice a world of good. It would also rub off on the Asian Heart Institute, which he heads. AIIMS of course is the premium medical institute in the country. That the Prime Minister chose it over any other hospital in the country is a great vote of confidence in the medical capabilities of the doctors and medical team at AIIMS.

Many years ago Atal Behari Vajpaye, the than Prime Minister of India had had a knee replacement surgery at the Breach Candy Hospital in Mumbai. Dr. Chitranjan Ranawat, a surgeon of Indian origin based in New York had operated on the Prime Minister. The hospital had remained in the limelight for many weeks, with the tremendous media coverage around the event. Though the Prime Minister recovered, his unseemly tottering  gait remained a poor advertisement for the surgery.     Continue reading

Advertisements

When Things Go Wrong in a Hospital

Sudhir Sharma, 58  was wheeled into the operating room early in the morning for what looked like a routine bypass surgery. The surgeon Dr. Roop Singh met his worrying friends and relatives, reassured them that he does not anticipate any complications and hopefully he will be done in 4 hours. The doctor seemed to be in good spirits and quite confident of the outcome.  

The relatives and friends of Mr. Sharma repaired to the Subway joint in the hospital for a quick breakfast and the morning coffee. The mood was hopeful and upbeat.

Not known to them things in the OR had gone horribly wrong. As Mr. Sharma was being put on a heart lung machine, disaster struck. A terrible mistake was made. Mr. Sharma’s aorta was connected with the line supplying oxygen from the machine. The mistake was discovered immediately and the team tried to revive Mr. Sharma,  but by then it was too late. Everyone in the team was shattered and were in a state of shock. One small terrible mistake had cost Mr. Sharma his life.   Continue reading