The Sales Vs. Marketing Conundrum in Healthcare

The Sales and Marketing functions in many hospitals in India still work independently of each other. There are invisible boundaries that separate the two and often it is considered heretical to get the twain to meet. The Marketing folks are the smart and savvy guys, who sit in their cloistered offices working on the holy grail that is called ‘strategy’, while the sales guys are the lowly folks, who need to sweat it out in the ‘field’. They are the ones who chase ”numbers” and perpetually suffer from their tyranny, while the Marketing folks grapple with the subtle nuances and the neat turns of phrase of advertising communication and the like. The sales folks are street smart, the Marketing guys worldly wise, the sales folks are rough at the edges, the Marketing guys are all suave and well rounded, the sales folks are the ones with their sleeves rolled-up and with their hair in the eyes, while the Marketing guys are impeccably turned out with neatly gelled hair, all in the right place…you get the drift.

Well, while one can go on in this vein, citing their differences, the fact remains that unless the Sales and Marketing folks work together, neither can really achieve great success. Yet, in many hospitals they hardly interact, leave alone work together.

The blame for this sorry state of affairs lies at both the ends of the spectrum. The sales people are programmed to chase, they are given no respite from the continuous and if I may add mind numbing quest for revenues. They do not have the time and even the inclination to sit back and think. A sales person, sitting idle, would soon enough invite the wrath of his supervisor. He would be labeled as a lazy day-dreamer who lacks ‘drive’ and ‘initiative’. On the other hand a Marketing person will have all the time in the world to think through each and every piece of communication that passes through his hands. He will weigh the pros and cons of the ‘copy’ and the way it is laid out in the ad. He will hold forth on the relevance of the ‘image’ that adorns the ad and of course the smallest detail like a misplaced comma or the uneven size of the font will not escape his attention. After all, he has been taught that God lies in the details.

In all this he will forget that the purpose of the advertising is perhaps to help the sales person drive in a few more customers through the hospital doors!

On the other hand this is what happens when sales guys try their hands at Marketing. Some time back I had the occasion to attend a sales review meeting at a hospital. The sales guy was holding forth on launching a few specialized clinics and the idea was to create communication informing the local community about the introduction and the benefits of these clinics. I recall one of the clinics to be launched was the ‘Heart Failure Clinic’, which offered specialized advise and support to patients in Heart Failure. The sales head briefed the Marketing team about the clinic and requested an ad. The Marketing team, sent out an ad, which talked about Heart Failure and exhorted patients suffering from heart failure to come to the clinic. The communication failed to inform the readers how to identify their condition as ‘Heart Failure’ and when exactly to approach the clinic. Strangely, it was also not very clear as to how a ‘Heart Failure Clinic’ was different from a routine consult with a cardiologist! ”If I am having a Heart Failure, wouldn’t I call the Emergency and rush to the hospital rather than wait for an appointment at the Heart Failure Clinic” asked a baffled HR person sitting in the review.

It was a mindless piece of communication done at the behest of the sales person, who was in a hurry to launch the clinic and a lazy Marketing guy, who wasn’t too bothered with the outcome of such inane advertising.

Now if only the Sales and Marketing teams had sat down together and looked at the issue at hand, which was how to drive cardiac patient volumes in the hospitals and come up with a plan, things could have been very different. Maybe a ”Heart Failure Clinic” might still have come up and the Marketing guy would have pointed out that it was best to market a Heart Failure Clinic to referring doctors rather than consumers in general. After all, isn’t Heart Failure a condition that will be identified by a local community doctor and would subsequently be referred to a ”Heart Failure Clinic” in a larger hospital.

If only the Sales and Marketing teams in hospitals forgot their differences and worked together, they could achieve so much more…together.

Advertisements