The Aggressive Patient

Why are we intimidating and beating up our doctors ever so often these days?

Every other day one see’s newspaper headlines where doctors find themselves facing angry patients and their attendants who believe that misbehaving with hospital staff and doctors is no big deal at all. That breaking furniture and maybe a few bones will get them better service or perhaps the hospital will waive off a portion of their bills. Doctors and hospitals today are quite scared of such hooligans, who create a nuisance in the hospital demanding better treatment for their patients without realizing that their behavior is putting other patients at grave risk.

Part of the reason for this I suppose is that we are becoming a more aggressive nation. The road rage that one witnesses on the roads in Delhi everyday, the ugly fights among neighbors usually for parking spots, the crazy honking even on a red light are perhaps all a manifestation of this malaise. The medical profession too I suppose cannot escape its share of problems in a society becoming louder, more aggressive and more demanding. Everyone seems to be on a short fuse.

In hospitals, where life and death situations are routine, people are perhaps a lot more stressed and express their frustrations by mishandling the folks right in front of them. These are mostly doctors and nurses, who bear the brunt of their anger. Little do they realize that beating up the doctor won’t help them get better care. And that beating-up anyone is no solution to any problem.

The other reason that I find for all this anger in the hospital is a lack of communication between doctors and the patient’s attendants. Usually, the clinicians are very busy folks who have very little time for patient’s attendants. They believe that their primary duty is to look after the patients, without realizing that in today’s world they also have an equal duty towards addressing the attendant’s fears and concerns regarding the patients. Hospitals spectacularly fail in impressing on the clinicians that they must meet the attendants regularly and address all their queries as honestly and as transparently as possible. This must be a part of a process and not a random meeting in a corridor or when a patient’s attendant catches hold of a doctor fortuitously. Better communication will help reduce these unsavory episodes far more than more security guards manning the hospital doors.

I also look upon these incidents as reflective of a loss of respect and trust between patients and doctors. With the media awash with stories of profiteering hospitals and grasping clinicians engaged in dubious practices, no wonder that the relationship between patients and doctors have almost broken down. The noble profession has been reduced to no more than a transaction. There is no longer the old world courtesy and respect that clinicians commanded not so long ago. No longer are they the Gods of their realms. This is rather sad. The relationship between a doctor and a patient and their care givers has to be a a bond of great trust. The patient willingly allows the doctor to treat and operate upon him believing that he will do so to the very best of his skills and ability. The doctor on the other hand accepts this as a huge and crushing responsibility and does his best to ensure that the patient comes to no harm, while under his care. This is the covenant that has always existed between doctors and patients. This sacred bond is now stretched almost to the breaking point.

What is it that we can do to get back from the brink??

As hospitals and clinicians we have to understand that the patients are increasingly getting impatient and we must learn to deliver all that we commit. We must find more time to address their concerns and not just fob them off with some sarcastic remark about their limited understanding of medical matters. We must engage with them more, learn to treat them as equals and partner them in their treatment. A dialogue is essential.

As patients and their attendants we must understand the tremendous pressure and responsibilities each clinician carries. We must also have an unshakable faith in their good intent, skills and abilities. This has to be a given. We must also have the wisdom to realize that in medicine an adverse outcome is not necessarily the fault of the doctor or the hospital. Actually, at times it is no one’s fault. We must treat our doctors and nurses as fallible humans, just like ourselves.

Finally, there will always be those who believe that creating a ruckus helps get things done in the hospital. In my view the hospital must deal with them firmly and take whatever action is required to ensure orderly conduct.

Violence can not be justified, whatever the reason or the grievance. Beating up ones doctor is almost the most stupid thing imaginable that one can do.

The views expressed are personal