The Doctors who Communicate Better, are Better Doctors.

Communication with patients is perhaps the most important component in the overall patient experience at the hospital, yet it is a rare hospital that gets it right. The communication with patients largely involves the clinicians. The nurses, front-office executives, the house-keeping staff and even the security guard manning the elevator too can help deliver a wonderful experience by reaching out with kind words. However, it is really the doctors, whose words make the biggest difference in a patient’s life.

A few years ago, a friend’s husband needed a kidney surgery. The patient was to be wheeled into the surgery at around 10 am in the morning and the surgery was to finish in 4 hours. He was wheeled in for surgery from the hospital room at around 0930 in the morning. When I met the friend’s family a couple of hours later the attendants sat huddled together in the cafeteria, anxious and hopeful in equal measures. The time went by rather lethargically and their anxiety kept mounting. When 6 hours had gone by, the frantic family members approached the doctor’s secretary, who assured them with great panache that the surgery has gone without any hitch and they will soon be able to see the patient. Much relieved, the family members decided to have a celebratory coffee as they waited to see the patient in the recovery.

While they waited to hear from their surgeon, a couple of hours went by. The helpful doctor’s secretary by now had finished work and gone home. The surgeon was no-where to be found and there was just no one who could give them any information about the patient. Again frantic with worry the friend reached out to me to get some information about the patient’s well being and also when can they possibly see him and their surgeon.

Concerned, I made inquiries with the team in the OR and learned that the patient’s surgery had been delayed by a few hours as the previous surgery in the same OT had lasted longer than planned. The surgeon had been busy operating his scheduled cases and did not have the time to step out and explain the delay to the anxious patient’s relatives. The surgeon’s secretary had not heard anything untoward from the OT either and just assumed that everything would have gone as planned.

The patient’s surgery was uneventful and he made a full recovery. However, for the patient’s attendants, this was a harrowing experience. This is a true incident, and we know that something like this happens every day in our hospitals.

I have often pondered over the stark difference in the situation between the surgeon and the patient. Consider this for a minute. For a surgeon, a surgery is something that he does every day (maybe multiple times every day!!!), for a patient it is a frightening and hopefully once a lifetime experience. The surgeon, while operating in his theatre, surrounded by a team that he has perhaps worked with for years is usually confident of his skills and the ability to help the patient. The patient and his family are on the other hand in an alien environment. No one likes to be in a hospital and surgery is scary. The outcome in the patient’s mind is always uncertain. Given a choice, he would be anywhere but the hospital. Such is the power imbalance and asymmetry in the equation between the doctor and the patient, that it is imperative that we use clear communication to keep things on as even a keel as possible.

Patients will always see doctors who communicate well as better clinicians. Patients and their families like their doctors if they step down from their pedestals and treat them as friends. They will readily narrate stories about their interaction with their doctors and tell all their family and friends on how approachable and wonderfully transparent their doctor was. They will readily recommend the doctor to their family and friends and ultimately restore the doctor back on the pedestal!!!

It is very hard for the hospital administrators to mandate processes that define when and how should the clinicians meet their patients. Afterall, this is really a matter between a doctor and his patient and the hospital management isn’t usually welcome as a participant in this relationship.

However, hospitals must encourage their doctors to spend more time with patients and their families and not just fob them off with brusque briefings in the corridors. They must provide infrastructure, where patients and their families can meet their doctors and spend time together.

Doctors who communicate well with their patients can easily transform the hospital experience for a vast majority of patients.  Hospitals will do well to remember that.

The views expressed are personal

 

 

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