The Destruction of Trust – A Media Trial and a Witch-Hunt

The last couple of weeks have been a difficult time for the healthcare services providers in the NCR of Delhi. The media have been busy reporting about how Fortis and Max Healthcare ill-treat their patients and how the only thing they care about is profits. Having worked in both the hospitals, I can only say that this is completely wrong. The media-houses in their zeal to sensationalise and chase TRP’s are doing a great dis-service to these hospitals and the the medical profession in the country. The reporting is biased, short on facts and the conclusions drawn are completely unwarranted even bordering on fantasy.

The stories pertain to two cases, one at Fortis Hospital, Gurgaon where a 7-year-old child died of complications related to Dengue and the hospital is accused of over-charging and being callous. The other pertains to Max Healthcare, which is charged with negligence as one of the twins born at 23 weeks gestation was wrongly declared dead at Max Hospital, Shalimar Bagh, Delhi. The false narrative being spun is that the hospital chains are negligent, money- making machines and do not care for their patients. The outrage is completely manufactured and the stories falsely amplified and one-sided.

To make matters infinitely worse the politicians too have jumped in. They clearly want to be seen as championing the poor masses, who mostly cannot afford the services of these hospitals. The hospitals are being subject to multiple enquiries and the police has been called in to investigate the ‘murders’. The hospitals are being threatened with the cancellation of their licenses. (Strangely, a few months ago when scores of children died at a government owned hospital in Gorakhpur because the hospital ran out of oxygen supplies, no one thought of cancelling the license of that hospital)

Lest, we forget, both these hospital chains are amongst the top 5 private healthcare services providers in India. Between them they run more than 40 hospitals, treating thousands of patients every day. They are amongst the most well equipped hospitals in the country, boasting of the highest levels of technology, processes and systems and have patient outcomes comparable to the best in the world. They employ the finest of clinical talent available in the country and provide them an environment to excel. The hospitals attract thousands of patients from all over the world, who travel from across the globe seeking treatment for the most complex of diseases. Having worked in both the organisations, I can confidently say, that while there are many differences between the two institutions, both are thoroughly committed to the highest standards of patient care.

In-spite of all this, the hospitals are not infallible. No hospital in the world is. They can only aspire to do better, keep improving themselves and always try to do the best they can.We need to ponder, how these centre of clinical excellence have suddenly become pariahs overnight basis two cases, where there have been lapses. Like in any other profession or sphere of human endeavour, errors are inevitable. Tight processes, technology support and intent to weed these errors out is far more important than the errors themselves. On these, I can say without any hesitation that the hospitals compare favourably  with the very best that we have in the country.

The line between genuine errors and negligence is very thin. Doctors, while racing to save lives are required to make split second decisions, which may mean the difference between life and death to their patients. Sometimes not taking a particular decision may prove fatal and at others taking a particular decision may lead to complications. We have to trust our doctors to take the right decisions based on their experience and judgement. We also have to accept the fact that their decisions might turn out to be wrong and that these decisions can have horrendous consequences. This is just the nature of medicine. An adverse outcome doesn’t mean that the surgeon or the hospital messed up. It mostly means that they tried their best and yet didn’t succeed.

This is something very fundamental to healthcare. As patients or care-givers, we must support the doctors as best as we can. We can question, we can ask but let us not blame, at least, not every time something goes wrong. If we believe that there is a case of genuine negligence, as consumers we do have options. We can lodge a complaint with the Indian Medical Council, approach the consumer courts or go to the police. We must use these options judiciously.

Getting back to the baby, who was born at 23 weeks of gestation at Max Hospital, Shalimar Bagh. It has now been established that the decision, not to resuscitate the child was medically correct as he had a very slim chance of survival. The prognosis in case of survival too was also very poor. The decision to declare the child lifeless, without fully ascertaining the fact of death was wrong. Failure to properly communicate this tragedy to the parents too was an error. Was this negligence? Was their any malafide intent of causing harm to the child or undue pain to his parents? In my view this certainly wasn’t the case. I am not an expert in these matters and various eminent clinicians are conducting an enquiry about what happened. My view as a layman is that someone made a mistake, it was a bad mistake to make, hopefully some lessons too would have been learned and this would never be repeated again.

Does this mean that the hospital, the doctors and the administrators be called vultures, cheats and murderers and have rampaging mobs running amok in the hospitals baying for their blood?

The views expressed are personal.

One thought on “The Destruction of Trust – A Media Trial and a Witch-Hunt

  1. It is a very well written Article Mr. Wajid. The patient mortality issue has been raging in India for decades. Not only the media has portrayed the hospitals to be evil doers committed to finance more than lives, but the lack of education of the masses and politicians have also made this a serious issue.

    There has been another news of an incident at a reputed hospital (Which I once worked for ) where a child undergoing B.M.T was declared dead due to an infection. The way that this was portrayed in the media clearly shows the lack of knowledge and callousness to portray hospitals in a very negative way. And the worse part is, this kind of propaganda sells like hot cakes in a country like ours. Little does the country realize that because of these private hospitals which have sprung into being in the past decade or so, the quality of healthcare has skyrocketed in India. The fact that there are more than 2,00,000 foreign patients coming to India explains this phenomena clearly.

    Also the masses should know an everyday surgeon spends about 20 years to get to the position he is, after which he spends his work day shuttling between running OPD’s and spending hours in the Operation theater committed to saving lives and enriching a person’s well being. The mala-fide intention is a construct made by the attention savvy media to soar profits instead of compassion towards the doctor who is, without a doubt, human. There is a need for reform and a fresh perspective towards the Indian Healthcare Industry.

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