Hiring Right Makes a Hospital Special

Hiring right, is at the best of times a tricky proposition, more so if one is attempting to hire people to work in a hospitals. This becomes even more difficult if one is hiring people in managerial roles in non-medical areas, folks such as the Front Office Executives, Case Managers, Service Line Managers or Sales Managers.

This is primarily because healthcare services are unlike any other service industry. The customers here are both patients and customers, they are unwell, they don’t want to be there but circumstances have forced them to seek the services of the hospital and the expenses incurred unlike say that of a restaurant or an amusement park are an unforeseen burden. Many a times, they have been compelled to travel far away from home and they are alone amongst strangers, who will have an immense amount of power over them. And to make things a lot worse is the lingering uncertainty about the medical outcomes, indeed about life and death.

People working in hospitals must understand these factors well. Medical folks because of the virtue of their training and  knowledge comprehend these facts instinctively. However service personnel, who have moved to healthcare services from say the hospitality sector are often caught by surprise and are left wondering about the interplay between patients, customers and hospital staff.

Thus, a hospital must be very careful in hiring the right people and then training them in handling customers and patients. Here is a small checklist of what I look for when hiring people in a hospital.

Empathy:

This is the single most important characteristic that I look for in an individual. It is absolutely essential that those who work in hospitals have empathy for patients and their attendants. Many years ago I heard a doctor say that she always tries to remember that it is not a tumour that she is treating, but a human being. Anyone who works in the hospital would do well to remember that. In a hospital I would like to hire people, who can connect with those in distress and interact with a measure of understanding and compassion.They must treat every patient and his problems as the only one that they have to handle that day.

Patience and Maturity:

It is imperative that a hospital hires mature people with loads of patience. This will help in managing patients, who are generally impatient-to see the doctor, get the tests done, lay their hands on that elusive report and get the hell out of the hospital. Since most people find it hard to understand matters related to their illnesses and treatment options, it is best that we have people who can explain these things patiently, without losing their cool and without showing the slightest signs of indifference.

Hunger for Knowledge:

It is a myth that in a hospital, medical knowledge should remain restricted to the medical folks and it is only they who need it. I have seen patients asking questions from patient care executives about arcane surgical procedures, about diagnostic tests prescribed by the doctors and even about their prognosis. To my mind, every individual working in a hospital should aim to acquire and benefit from basic medical knowledge. For me, part of the charm of working in a hospital has always been the immense amount of knowledge I gain by interacting with medical colleagues. In conversation with doctor colleagues, if I find myself lost, I never hesitate to ask them to stop and explain things to me in terms that I can understand. It always helps, when I am required to explain a procedure to let us say a foreign patient contemplating travel to our hospitals in Delhi.

Ability to Get Along with Doctors

It takes a special kind of skill to work with busy doctors, who are always short on time and stressed out. One needs to adapt to their work schedules and understand their pressures to put things in the right perspective. Also, one must remember that they are trained as doctors and not as professional managers, thus often their understanding of a manager’s world is not the same as that of another professional manager. In my experience it is best to always try to understand, where they might be coming from rather than articulating management dogma, which they may not understand well or may find obnoxious.

Optimistic and Cheerful Disposition:

Those blessed with an optimistic and cheerful world view do well in a hospital. A hospital needs loads of people with a sunny disposition, who always look at the brighter side of things and who are hard to put down. These are individuals, who are eager to help, who go out of their way, do that bit extra to make someone happy, because that is what makes them happy.

Rigorous training and an organisational culture based on openness and trust helps these people become good to great and transform the hospital into a wonderful place of healing and caring.

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3 thoughts on “Hiring Right Makes a Hospital Special

  1. Absolutely on the dot Anas ! And even more important than this is the training of people . . . leading them by example . . . re-writing their mental lexicon – where the word “customer” has to be replaced by “patient”, the word “business” with “service” and the word “job” with “mission”.

    I agree about your bit on the species called “doctors”. Well, now that I am myself pursuing an MBA program I’m developing a better understanding of the “managers” & “business”. The gap can be bridged easily by regular semi-formal interactions & work-shops of these two groups together. May be we should brainstorm together to develop a small program for this.

  2. Good Morning,

    All the 5 thoughts are really worth learning and training the staff. Good and Great Article !!!

    Regards, Lakshman

  3. I agree! Especially when we interact with patients as potential case studies, it is our responsibility to give them the confidence that their privacy will not be compromised and we too shall not impose ourselves.

    Understanding & communicating with doctors isn’t as difficult as I thought it could be. All you need to do is read on the subject and pose sensible questions. That way they feel you aren’t wasting their time and will be able to befriend them too.

    A good post Anas, it worked as a reminder for me.

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