The Necessity of Sunday OPDs

The other day a colleague called on a Sunday morning. He was hoping to meet a doctor in a hospital OPD and was seeking directions to the hospital. The colleague, whom I will call Sanjay here, had recently joined work and was for some reason feeling a little under the weather. Nothing serious, but the usual stresses, which are so familiar to sales people in the month of March. When he shared his symptoms with me, I advised him to see a doctor and on this Sunday morning he was headed to the hospital.

However, much to his dismay I informed him that hospital OPD’s are generally closed on Sunday mornings and he might as well head back or he was really unwell he could visit the emergency services. ‘Listen, I really do not think I need to go to the ER, can you help me find a hospital, where in a physician can examine me, check my BP and hopefully start me on some medication that can take care of my niggling symptoms?’ hollered Sanjay over the phone.

Here is why I believe Sunday OPD’s are a great idea.

Most people like Sanjay, who lead busy overworked lives find it difficult to take time off from work and visit their physicians, particularly for small niggles except on Sundays. A lingering cough, a bad cold, a running nose, a painful joint, a niggling back ache are pretty much part of the power packed 9 to 9 week. Most people ignore these or try self medication to keep going till the weekend. (I know they shouldn’t, but they do). If things haven’t taken a turn for the better by then, Sunday mornings are the time to see the doctor. Thus, for a hospital running Sunday OPD’s, would mean offering a great convenience to its customers.

Saturdays are generally the busiest in a hospital. The simple reason is that in many work places, Saturday is a holiday and customers get an opportunity to visit the hospital to see their doctors, get the pending diagnostic tests done, get the physiotherapy they need and attend to their own and their families healthcare needs.  For the same reason, Sundays can be even busier.

While I worked at Artemis Health Institute in Gurgaon, we had started doing a “Public Forum’, on Sunday mornings. This involved inviting our customers and pretty much the public in general to come to the hospital and listen to doctors discuss common medical conditions in layman’s terms. Post the presentations we had an interactive session, where the doctors took questions from the audience. The sessions ended with brunch, which afforded opportunity for people to interact with the doctors one on one. When the idea was first mooted, I must confess, I was not sure of the kind of public response to expect. My fears evaporated on the morning of the first day that we held the forum. We had a house-full with people standing in the aisles of the 270 seater auditorium we had in the hospital. We not only generated a full-house, we also generated lots of goodwill from the local community.

Thus Sunday OPD’s are not only a revenue opportunity, they also are a wonderful opportunity to generate the goodwill of the local community. It is also an opportunity for the hospital to communicate that it cares.

With all this going for a Sunday OPD, why do hospitals are still chary of having a full-fledged Sunday OPD?

The answer is that they can not get the doctors to come out and work on Sundays. Most doctors love their Sunday mornings as much as you and I do and hate to work (just like you and me, I guess!) Sundays. Hospitals have tried cajoling and even forcing them to attend to Sunday OPD’s but have met with no success. They have offered other weekdays as holidays in lieu of Sundays, which too hasn’t worked.

The only way to convince the doctors to do a Sunday OPD is to convince them of its immense value both from a business as well as a customer need point of view. The hospitals must also make it worth the while for the doctors by handsomely rewarding them for attending OPD’s on Sundays. Last but not the least the hospitals must spend big bucks in marketing the Sunday OPD’s. Once the patients start trickling in, the doctors too will not mind spending their Sunday mornings in the hospital.

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One thought on “The Necessity of Sunday OPDs

  1. Dear Anas,the idea of sunday opd is a double edged sword.it has its benefits as u have highlighted but think of it from doctors point of view..the only day u can even look at the garden of your house,have a peaceful breakfast n not grabbing a toast n rush off to work,looking at your child’s curriculum,not to mention the endless list of home chores.it is quite therapeutic to water the plants,wash ur car,tinker ur music system,arrange the folders/photoalbums on ur laptop,share time with family n friends..why would the hospitals want to deprive the doctors of their one day of quality life?the same patient can come on weekday too if he genuinely needs urgent medical help(usually the sunday opd is full of health issues which are minor and can wait as u have also pointed in ur mail) ,we dont have to spoil them by giving sunday choice just as a marketing strategy.in western countries,it is five days a week,during my fellowship in london i learnt that consultants do not even attend a phone call at weekends.the emergency services are running to take care of sick patients on weekends…but to do an elective opd on sunday is robbing the workers(doctors n staff) to perform more efficiently in coming week.in india the need to survive creates such situations..i have also worked on many sundays but after being in practice for 12 years can make the choice of not working on all sundays n trust me it has been worth it. Dont u feel rejuvenated n ready to take the world on after a good relaxed sunday?

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