The Silly Question of RoI in Healthcare Marketing

The other day I was with Dr. Jadhav who heads the Marketing function at the well known Narayan Hrudayalaya in Bangalore. Dr. Jadhav was keen to use radio for his hospital’s communication needs and I was hoping to persuade him to advertise with Fever 104, the radio station owned by The Hindustan Times, my current employers. Narayan Hrudayalaya, which is a well-known cardiac hospital thanks to the famous Dr. Devi Shetty and his pioneering initiatives, has recently started a Cancer Centre as well as a Multi Speciality hospital and wanted to promote these. The aim of the communication was to tell the citizens of Bangalore about these services available at Narayan Hrudayalaya and to drive ‘footfalls’.

While I discussed the plans with Dr. Jadhav, I could not help but notice his concern about the RoI on his marketing spends. Dr. Jadhav was very clear that if he spent Rs. 100, he needed 3 times the  sum in revenue, which could be directly attributed to this activity. I could easily relate to this because this is exactly the kind of  expectations the management teams had of me, when I headed the Marketing function at Max Healthcare and Artemis Health Institute.

I wish calculating RoI on healthcare spends was this easy. While there are many websites, which help one calculate RoI on marketing spends using complex formulae and spreadsheets involving the lifetime value of a customer, the cost of capital and what have you, I believe quite often the best way forward is a subjective gut feel and patience.

Measuring the success of a healthcare marketing campaign by merely counting the number of queries/walk ins generated in the hospital OPD is a great folly. The hospital business is unlike any other business and one must remember that exciting marketing communication alone will not lead to people walking in to check out the services of the hospital. This can happen for a new restaurant or a movie theatre,  but for someone to visit a hospital he must have a pressing need.

Tactical communication involving discounts, freebies and the like should be handled with care. I am not sure I would prefer to go to hospital for cardiac surgery because there is a discount being offered on the surgery, or I would like to go under the knife at a particular time just because the hospital is offering a deal. Come to think of it, I would be downright suspicious of the hospital if it tries to hustle me into a medical procedure by making a commercial offer.

Marketing spends in a hospital must be looked upon as an investment in the hospital brand and the values it stands for. The customers should be informed about the services of the hospital, the experience and training of its doctors, the robustness of its systems and processes and above all the promise of the experience the hospital hopes to deliver to its customers. It can highlight its ease of access, competitive pricing vis-a-vis other hospitals and superior services.  The hospital must showcase medical excellence, send out stories of success against great odds and constantly remind its customers what it truly stands for. It needs to communicate all or some of these over time before it should even attempt to measure the RoI.

A hospital’s brand equity is built over many years and much as hospital marketers would like to hurry this up, there are just no shortcuts. A hospital must set aside a small sum of money (7% of sales in the first years tapering to 2-3% in later years) year on year to spend on connecting with its patients and the local communities it hopes to serve. It should diligently spend this money informing, educating and reinforcing its brand values.

A few years later, the hospital will find itself buzzing with patients and no one would really be interested in the RoI on marketing spends.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “The Silly Question of RoI in Healthcare Marketing

  1. I thought you had stopped writing your blogs–with the pressures of your present job and ofcourse family life is also important–but nice to see that you can spare time for your blog pages–

    I was in Chandigarh recently and deliverd a lecture on Ethics in healthcare and we had a good forum of teachers and doctors from PGI etc who debated about the role of marketing and the limits it has to define for all stakeholders–We discussed organ transplants,Drugs,MTP’s,Ethics in surgery etc–Marketing in Corporate hospitals is getting too focussed on money making than patient care and comfort–

    For any professi0nal who can think rationally and does’t want to do his job only to earn money–Healthcare marketing offers a tough platform in indian context today—Healthcare providers especially non-doctors are too focussed on ROI and doctors are on the other extreme–
    But I was glad some debate has started happening on these issues in professional circles–

  2. Yes I do agree with you. This is the way how to build brand value. At the end of the
    day, the patients’ care, cost & quality match plays an important role in such speciality hospitals. Patient & his family should feel more comfortable & confident
    in getting best treatment with reasonable cost, under good expertise doctors & staff.

    Narayan Hrudayalaya it self is a big & respected Brand. They shld focus & workon sustaining the Brand Value.
    Nagesh Rao
    Mumbai

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s